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The Advanced Course – Part 3

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Basic Strategy Variations: Double?

The opportunity to double your bet in return for agreeing to accept only one more card is a very powerful option for the player, if it’s utilized correctly. I can’t tell you how often I see players double hands like 7 or 8 against a dealer’s up card of 6 and then bemoan their fate when they lose. Yes, the dealer is very vulnerable with a 6 showing, but placing an extra bet changes the mathematics of the hand, so all doubles must be well-considered. For example, in a six-deck game where the dealer stands on A-6, doubling a hand of 8 against the dealer’s 6 has a total return of 10.3% whereas just hitting the hand returns 12.3% and the risk is lower!

That said, there comes a time when it is worthwhile to double an 8 against a dealer’s 6 and that’s when there’s a higher proportion than normal of 10s left in the deck. That point is determined, of course, by the true count. As the true count gets more positive, it becomes more profitable to double. Conversely, as the count goes negative, it becomes a better play to hit some hands, rather than double.

Just as you’re using flashcards to learn the hit/stand variations, make up, a set for doubling. Here are the numbers you need:

Basic Strategy Variations Six decks, dealer stands on A-6

Soft Doubling

A-2 vs. 4 Double at 7. (Got this? Basic strategy says to HIT A-2 against a 4, but if the true count is 7 or higher, you should double.)

A-2 vs. 5 Double at 0. (Don’t get confused here. Basic strategy says DOUBLE A-2 against a 5, but if the count is at all negative, just hit it; double only when the count is 0 or higher.)

A-2 vs. 6 Double at -2. (or higher. As long as the count remains above -2, you’ll double; once it goes lower than -2, you’ll just hit — then hopefully leave the table if the count doesn’t improve.)

A-3 vs. 4 Double at 6.

A-3 vs. 5 Double at -2.

A-4 vs. 4 Double at 0.

A-7 vs. 2 Double at 2.

A-8 vs. 4 Double at 5.

A-8 vs. 5 Double at 2.

A-8 vs. 6 Double at 1.

A-9 vs. 5 Double at 6.

A-9 vs. 6 Double at 5.

 

Hard Doubling

8 vs. 5 Double at 6.

8 vs. 6 Double at 3.

9 vs. 2 Double at 2.

9 vs. 3 Double at -1

9 vs. 7 Double at 6.

10 vs. 9 Double at -2.

11 vs. A Double at 1.

 

Homework

Make up a set of flashcards for these variations and begin working them into your game.

Questions? E-mail me at [email protected] and I’ll get back to you ASAP.

The GameMaster OnLine, is the on-line คาสิโน gambling ‘zine with attitude, a man-about-town focus and a commitment to winning, both on-line and in the casino. As the original creative director and the master strategist of the Rolling Good Times we brought you the web’s first real gambling ‘zine. Please stop by our web site and see how we can enhance your casino experience.

 

The Advanced Course – Part 4

 

Basic Strategy Variations: To Split or Not To Split

The primary factor to consider when splitting pairs is whether or not your casino of choice allows doubling after splitting (DAS). If DAS is allowed, you must have the proper basic strategy memorized. I see players make a lot of errors in splitting pairs, primarily with a hand of 8, 8. Most know that a pair of 8s should be split against all up cards, but most stand when they hold them against a dealer’s 10. The cost of that mistake isn’t huge, simply because a hand of 8,8 is fairly rare. But by standing, a player has an expectation of -.537% and by splitting (if DAS is allowed), an expectation of -.483% is realized. So, the extra money which is put to risk does — in the long run — give a better return. Think of it this way. Would you rather stand with a 16 against a 10 or hit an 8 against a 10? By splitting, you get to hit an 8. Incidentally, the numbers also indicate that splitting is best when DAS isn’t allowed, though there isn’t as big a difference.

As the true count goes up, you’ll split more and as it goes down, you’ll split less. One play which is justified by a high count is the splitting of 10s. For example, there may come a time when it’s worthwhile to split a pair of face cards against a 6. I counsel my students to avoid that play since it draws such a negative reaction from other players at the table. I don’t really care what the others at a table think of my play, but if the floor personnel are alerted to what I’ve done, their initial suspicion may be that I’m a counter. If they’ve seen me playing good basic strategy and suddenly I have a big bet out and I do something like splitting 10s against a 6, they’re going to think I’m either very stupid or very smart. I guess it all relates to the image your projecting in the casino; if it’s one of a ‘wild man’, then go for it. But if you’re quiet, polite and a non-drinker, I’d advise against making the play.

All other splitting situations should be followed to the letter; especially that of splitting 4s against a 5 or 6 (if DAS is allowed). Most people don’t have the pairs part of basic strategy memorized perfectly, so they won’t know what’s right or wrong when you do it and most think it’s wrong to split 4s. Nothing quite like making the right play and looking like a dummy when you do it!

As you go through the numbers on splitting pairs, you’ll see that some don’t agree with those published by Stanford Wong and other authors. As I’ve explained before, some have been modified as a result of Friedman’s study on risk-averse play, and I feel they take no advantage from you yet do lower your risk somewhat.

Basic Strategy Variations:

Double after split allowed.

3,3 vs. 2 Hit at 0 or lower. (Instead of splitting.)

4,4 vs. 5 Hit at 0 or lower.

4,4 vs. 6 Hit at -2 or lower.

6,6 vs. 2 Hit at -2 or lower.

8,8 vs. 10 Stand at 8. (If the count is really high, you do stand instead of hit.)

9,9 vs. 7 Split at

Questions? E-mail me at [email protected] and I’ll get back to you ASAP.

The GameMaster OnLine, is the on-line gambling ‘zine with attitude, a man-about-town focus and a commitment to winning, both on-line and in the casino. As the original creative director and the master strategist of the Rolling Good Times we brought you the web’s first real gambling ‘zine. Please stop by our web site and see how we can enhance your casino experience.

 

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